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  Where Did We Sit on the Bus? at Online Stream

Where Did We Sit on the Bus?

Online Stream

Where Did We Sit on the Bus? is an electric one-man show pulsing with Latin rhythms, rap, hip-hop, spoken word, and live looping. During a third-grade lesson on the civil rights movement and Rosa Parks, a Latino boy raises his hand to ask, "Where did we sit on the bus?" and his teacher can't answer the question. This thrilling autobiographical production from Jeff Award winner Brian Quijada examines what it means to be Latino through the eyes of a child, turned teenager, turned adult.

Presented by Victory Gardens Theater and Geva Theatre Center

Thru - Mar 7, 2021


Show Times TBA


Price: $10-$30

Show Type: Performance Art

www.victorygardens.org



  Where Did We Sit on the Bus? Reviews
  • Highly Recommended
  • Recommended
  • Somewhat Recommended
  • Not Recommended

Around The Town Chicago - Highly Recommended

"...Bursting with comedy, wit, and thoughtful self-examination, Brian Quijada's 90-minute autobiographical show is a one-man marvel! It's impressive how Quijada holds our attention throughout as he rotates his monologue from his own perspective to that of his father and his mother. Quijada (which means "jaw" in Spanish) takes us on his quest to become "the best performer he could be" and finds himself thrilling audiences on stage at his March 2016 world-premiere show at the Victory Gardens Theater, in Chicago. Exactly five years later, the 2021 resurrection of this live event works perfectly for remote viewing on Vimeo as a collaboration between the Victory Gardens, Bitter Jester Studios, and the Geva Theatre Center, all of which have produced this show as part of their 2020-2021 offerings."
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Julia W. Rath


TotalTheater - Highly Recommended

"...Hindsight tells us that when Ms. Parks was defying the seating arrangements of Alabama's public transit in 1955, Quijada's peers were likely being nudged to the backs of buses in California-but our storyteller is not content to leave us anticipating his prospective offspring suffering under chauvinistic myth as their father did. "There's a new bus now" he proclaims, "and we're driving it, and we're picking everyone up, and we can go ANYWHERE!""
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Mary Shen Barnidge



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