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  Jeeves Saves The Day Reviews
Jeeves Saves The Day
First Folio Theatre

  • Highly Recommended
  • Recommended
  • Somewhat Recommended
  • Not Recommended

Daily Herald- Recommended

"...Director Joe Foust and his game cast have a field day playing up the exaggerated emotions and near slapstick physical humor in Raether's clever script. Klarer, in particular, stands out when it comes to silliness. The actors also look impeccable in designer Rachel Lambert's stylish jazz-age costumes against the beautiful cottage backdrop by set designer Angela Weber Miller."
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Scott C. Morgan



Chicago Reader- Highly Recommended

"...The clash between Johnston's matriarch, whose practical iron-fist approach is undercut by her belief in spiritualism, and Sinitski's hilariously devoid-of-humor shrink, also lights the spark in a second-act seance, arranged by Jeeves as the unlikely answer to resolving all the complications. Visually, the show is also a stylish treat, thanks to Angela Weber Miller's sunny cottage setting and Rachel Lambert's detailed period costumes. Overall, seeing this show is like getting just a wee bit day-drunk on some lovely champagne, knowing that the hangover is going to be returning to our own current reality. If you need the break, Jeeves understands."
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Kerry Reid



Around The Town Chicago- Highly Recommended

"...”I like it when a plan comes together.” Such is the phrase used by George Peppard, as Hannibal Smith, at the end of every TV episode of “The A-Team.” The same can be said about “Jeeves Saves the Day”, a delightful comedy currently being performed by First Folio Theatre. Written by Margaret Raether and based on characters by P.G. Wodehouse, this script introduces us to Bertie Wooster (Christian Gray) and his longstanding valet, confidante, and problem-solver Jeeves (Jim McCance)—and a considerable dilemma that Jeeves resolves neatly and tidily in the end, such that only he and his employer are the wiser."
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Alan Bresloff