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  Still Dance the Stars Reviews
Still Dance the Stars
Still Dance the Stars

Still Dance the Stars
New Light Theater Project and Chicago Dramatists at Chicago Dramatists
Thru - Sep 16, 2017

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New Light Theater Project and Chicago Dramatists at Chicago Dramatists

  • Highly Recommended
  • Recommended
  • Somewhat Recommended
  • Not Recommended

Chicago Reader- Not Recommended

"...The rest of the 90-minute show, however, is an awful mess, largely because McGhan piles conceit after coy conceit atop the essentially simple story of a couple unable to cope with their mourning. There's the one piece of business about a viral video, the other about a heartless TV reporter, the third about stuffed animals come to life, the fourth about quirky relatives-all of them simultaneously overwritten and vague, none able to mask the fact that McGhan has nothing unique to say about his core subject."
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Tony Adler



Time Out Chicago- Somewhat Recommended

"...With the exception of Carl H. Jaynes as James's father, the cast, too, lack nuance. Where Jaynes has an easy humor and humility befitting an absent father trying to do right, the rest of the cast seem focused on quickly getting to the end of the play. Only in a silent moment, a danced pas de deux between Anne and Hope, does the evening achieve a compelling moment of beauty. Otherwise, for all of its attempts at theatrical magic and bittersweet honesty, Still Dance the Stars stumbles over its own feet."
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Joseph Pindelski



Splash Magazine- Recommended

"...While some of the action and it's vehicles are farfetched and silly- such as choosing to portray the dead infant as a pink hippopotamus in toe shoes- the conceit works well in other respects- like casting the television show host in a villain's costume. Putting aside these antics, the best moments in the play by far are the intimate moments of sadness and tenderness, when the actors, playing the main characters "straight"- ie, sans stuffed animal familiars- express their true feelings. The interaction between Anne and her mother, on the floor, when Anne is sobbing her heart out for her lost baby, and her mother sooths and strokes her is very affecting. Less so is the calculated tearjerker end, which this reviewer won't spoil."
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Debra Davy